Monday, July 16, 2018

Joy of Six 2018


Saturday morning was interesting.  Having got up early to make sure I had everything I needed to take to Joy of Six, I managed to fall from a chair I was standing on to investigate the contexts of a box.  As a result, I arrived at Sheffield Hallam University with a badly swollen little finger, a bloody toe-nail, a sore biceps, and assorted scrapes and bruises.  I mostly managed to forget about the damage, though, as Joy of Six was a genuine pleasure.
We, the Cold War Commanders, were putting on three games under the “Wesel-Cubed” banner.  The idea was to fight a similar action three times in three different time periods.  I’m afraid I didn’t get very many photos; I was too busy playing and talking to the punters!
Looking north-east from above Wesel, 1973
We had three five-feet-square tables each depicting the north-eastern approaches to the German town of Wesel.  In each case, a hasty attack on the town was being mounted by a Soviet Motor Rifle Regiment and in each case a British mechanised battalion with armour support was defending.

On the first table it was 1959.  Andy Taylor’s British seemed to be doing a pretty good job of defending Wesel from Richard Phillips (who was using Mark Julian’s Soviets).  Andy’s defensive efforts were aided by Richard’s ability to roll command blunders at key moments.  On this table the Soviets had T-55s and T-10 heavy tanks and they were opposed by Centurions and Conquerors.  This period saw the last hurrah of the heavy tank concept.
The outskirts of Wesel, 1959. The tanks near the green
die in the foreground are Conquerors.
High water mark of the Soviet advance in 1959; Richard P
moves his T-10s through the woods.

The centre table depicted Wesel in 1973.  Here, my Chieftains and FV432s were up against Neil McCusker’s T-62s.  Pretty much just T-62s it turned out; Neil forgot to bring the BTR-60s for his infantry to ride in so the conscripts had to go in on foot.  This didn’t cramp Neil’s style too much, though, and although T-62s died in droves, he had enough the whittle away at my meagre stock of Chieftains.  By the end of the day he was in a position to sweep around my left flank.
1CHESHIRES at Wesel, 1973.

C company advance up Route 70
Near the end in 1973; Neil's T-62s cross the stream.
Over on the final table Ian Shaw’s 1989 Soviets (with T-80s) were faced by Andy Canham’s Challengers.  This table saw another British victory with the Soviets failing to cross the stream that ran between the two forces.

The public response to the game was pleasing.  Several people mentioned that is was a good idea and there was much praise for the terrain (most of it by Richard Phillips) and the fact that it changed slightly from period to period.

As always, we didn’t get as much actual game play in as we would at a Cold War Commanders gaming weekend but that was only because there were so many interesting people to talk to.  It was particularly nice to talk to veterans who had served in the Wesel area, some of them at the times covered by our games.

Oh, and nice to chat with Neil Shuck and to meet the famous “My other mate Dave”.








11 comments:

Lee Hadley said...

Great looking game.

Pete. said...

Was great to see the table at the show and stop for a chat.

Looking forward to seeing what you put on next year.

Cheers,

Pete.

Counterpane said...

Thanks Lee!

Counterpane said...

Pete, did you and I get to chat? I'd like to put a face to the name/icon! Let me know who you are next time!

Tales from Shed HQ said...

A great days gaming with friends! Tables looked fantastic and had some nice chats with interested viewers. All in all another superb Joy of Six. Now to start planning 2019 :-)

Pete. said...

We did get to chat- I was the 6 foot guy in glasses, cropped hair and black t shirt and jeans (I realise that could be a few people there that day).

I liked your idea on the different stat cards for the planes and said it was something I'd bring into my own games.

Cheers,

Pete.

Itinerant said...

What are these stat cards?

Tales from Shed HQ said...

We make small cards for each aircraft that is available for air support. Each stat card has the number of attacks, weapons etc. Especially useful in our big games where we use a pool of aircraft then the player makes a check for air support. We use playing cards and before the game starts the umpires set out the available air support e.g. a two of hearts maybe a Tornado. If another player also draws a two of hearts unfortunately his request for air support is denied. Umpires can also mix up the pool of aircraft throughout the weekend. We also use s system whereby if a player rolls a roll well below their required roll they may get two Tornado attacking. On a double 1 we have specials like a B52 or B2 etc

Tales from Shed HQ said...

Yes my attack on the 1959 table started well with a double 1 but unfortunately I later rolled two double 6 command blunders on the same unit, the T10’s which meant their attack came to a complete halt and saw them retreating back over the stream. This wasn’t helped by my opponent, Andy T, rolling a total of 6 double 1’s throughout the game πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

Andrew Taylor said...

Well if you gloat over getting a double 1 on the first turn then you're just tempting fate... πŸ˜‚
It's a pity that Rich's T10s got hit by the double blunder. Having them emerge from the woods and take on Conquerors & Centurions at point blank range would have been interesting.

Tales from Shed HQ said...

Says the fella who rolled six double 1’s πŸ˜‚πŸ€£